Continuing our Travel LA tour to Little Ethiopia this week!

This week our Travel LA tour takes to Little Ethiopia!  We will be going to Rosalind’s Ethiopian Restaurant on Fairfax on Thursday night.

Little Ethiopia: Travel the World LA enjoy a communal Ethiopian dinner and Coffee
Thursday, March 8th @ 7 pm
https://www.meetup.com/OffbeatLA/events/247267622/

Not sure what Ethiopian cuisine is…well it is spectacular!  Ethiopia — a country with incredibly fertile land and a rich history, including the site of the earliest human habitation.  Think, strong, spicy flavors and rich stews.

The first rule of thumb when eating in Ethiopia is to use your hands! Eating with your hands is a standard practice in Ethiopia.  And only use your right hand to eat, and no finger licking!

You will also notice that there is no pork or shellfish of any kind served in Ethiopian restaurants. This is due to the major religions that have influenced the country over thousands of years: Judaism, Islam and Orthodox Christianity.

Here are some of the foodstuff you will find in Ethiopian cuisine:

Injera

Injera is a flatbread made from teff, a grass (not a grain, like wheat) that’s fermented with water for several days before being baked into large, floppy pancakes that have the texture of crepes and the taste of sourdough bread. Unexpectedly, teff flour is high in fiber, iron and calcium and has all the amino acids required to be a complete protein AND gluten-free. To eat Ethiopian food, simply tear off a piece of injera, grab some food with it, roll it up, pop the whole thing into your mouth and repeat until finished.

Wat

wat (or wot) is Ethiopian curry or stew. Starting as red onions cooked down with butter infused with ginger, garlic and other spices.  Then it can become a vegetable dish or a meat stew.  Common ingredients include; lentils, carrot, potatoes and cabbage

Tibs

Similar to “fajitas,” Tibs can be made with marinated beef or lamb and sauteed with vegetables.

Coffee

Are you a coffee connoisseur, you will be happy to find that coffee plays a central role in Ethiopian cuisine. There is a traditional coffee ceremony that includes three rounds of the beverage, finger-food snacks such as popcorn and the burning of incense.

 

Or join us on another night as we explore the many ethnic communities in Los Angeles: